“Maturity is not when we start speaking big things, it is when we start understanding small things.”
— Aamir Khan

 

Each age brings its own Maturity. At least that is the way it has been for me. At fifteen many of us believe that we are mature and that we know and understand it all. We believe that we are ready for any test that life can give us and (at least in our minds) we believe that we speak and act like adults. We pronounce on the universe and our place in it.
In our twenties, many of us start to question our beliefs. Indeed we may question whether we know anything for sure. s. Life starts to test us and we find that things may not be as easy as we once thought. The questioning can often be the beginning of new wisdom.
In our thirties, we my come to an appreciation of more subtle things. We refine our beliefs or become fixed in them. We seek to expand our knowledge and our power. As we watch the generation before ours age we may start to question our mortality.
In our forties and beyond some of us once again question wheat we know and indeed whether it is possible to know. We come to an appreciation of the more subtle things in life and appreciate the many gifts that we have been given. We realize that we don’t have the life we expected to have but what we have is in many ways brighter and richer. We learn patience from our children, our partners, our coworkers and our parents. If we haven’t learned it yet, we learn that there is life beyond ours and it will continue after we are gone.
I can’t wait to see what happens next
Note: When I use the word ‘know’ in the above, I mean an experiential understanding beyond the intellectual. Something akin to what Heinlein meant when he used the term ‘grock’.
Blessings, G

 

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IntroductionIntroduction by G A Rosenberg

 

Falling Into ItFalling Into It by G A Rosenberg